Economic justice

Our work following the economic crisis aims to:
  • Ensure the lessons of the crisis are not lost. The economy must work for people and planet and not the reverse.
  • Make the needs poor small businesses and farmers a priority in economic and private sector plans, such as those discussed at the G20.
  • Promote regulation of international finance, trade and investment that works for development.

In light of global recession, climate change and persisting poverty, we must rethink how to make the global economy work for development.

Global markets have delivered too much risk and not enough return for the millions of men and women living in poverty. Many poor workers, small business owners and farmers suffered devastating consequences of the 2008 financial crisis because of their vulnerable position in global markets. Many others were excluded and simply not benefiting in the first place.

Faith in markets to deliver progress has been shaken, and the moral responsibilities of individuals and governments in guiding the economy have been rediscovered. The need to put economic growth back in its place as a tool for real progress, not a proxy for progress or a goal in its own right has risen up the policy agenda.

Politicians have acknowledged that we are “all in this together” and that vast global inequalities are not just indefensible, they are unsustainable and hurt us all by generating instability and dampening the global economy

Policy and research documents on economic justice

Found 11 results

  • How can a Green Economy Power the SDGs? How can a Green Economy Power the SDGs? (2mb, pdf)
    Graham Gordon, Head of Public Policy at CAFOD

    If Green Economy approaches are going to support the sustainable development goals, they need to be take a much more transformational approach and focus beyond technical and economic priorities. Rooting the plans in the SDGs, they need a greater focus on citizen participation, leave no-one behind and environmental sustainability. This briefing summarises an analysis of existing Green Economy plans and recommends priorities for future work.  

  • Delivering sustainable development: A principled approach to public-private finance - April 2015 Delivering sustainable development: A principled approach to public-private finance - April 2015 (369kb, pdf)

    Achieving the sustainable development goals (SDGs) will require significant amounts of money. Governments across the world are increasingly looking at ways of working with the private sector to provide this money, but the challenge is to ensure that all finance contributes to sustainable development. For this to happen, we propose a set of principles for all governments to apply both in the project and programme design and development as well as in any monitoring and accountability mechanisms.

  • Common Good and the Economy Common Good and the Economy (732kb, pdf)

    CAFOD considers how Catholic Social Teaching and the theme of the ‘common good’ can form the basis of a much-needed reframing of the UK and global economies.

  • What is inclusive growth? (summary paper) – August 2014 What is inclusive growth? (summary paper) – August 2014 (273kb, pdf)

    This paper summarises the key points of our full “what is inclusive growth” discussion paper considering briefly the context for inclusive growth, a working definition for the concept and some important criteria for those wanting to achieve it. A short case study considering the role that small businesses could play in delivering inclusive growth is also presented.

  • What is inclusive growth? (full paper) – August 2014 What is inclusive growth? (full paper) – August 2014 (397kb, pdf)

    Achieving inclusive growth is increasingly desirable for governments, institutions and donors. But what exactly is it and how do we achieve it? This CAFOD discussion paper considers the context for inclusive growth, proposes a working definition for the concept and identifies some important criteria for those wanting to achieve it. We end the paper with a short case study considering the role that small businesses could play in delivering inclusive growth.

  • Thinking small Thinking small resources

    This resource collection contains some of CAFOD’s thinking and work around the role that small businesses play in reducing poverty and what we can do to better support this important sector.

  • Doing Business extra Doing Business resources

    All our papers, reviews and recommendations on the World Bank's Doing Business Review.

  • CIDSE statement for G20 St Petersburg Summit (March 2013) CIDSE statement for G20 St Petersburg Summit (March 2013) (401kb, pdf)

    Russia’s presidency of the G20 should mark a new phase in its work on development and a greater attention to making markets work for poverty eradication and environmental sustainability.

  • Investors running wild on land (January 2013) Investors running wild on land (January 2013) (545kb, pdf)

    In this briefing, supported by CAFOD, Traidcraft Exchange makes the case that global investment rules are imbalanced and risk undermining important development impacts of foreign investment and can even threaten food security.

  • Aid for trade report (December 2012) Aid for trade report (December 2012) (1,009kb, pdf)

    Donors need to do more to know if their spending on economic development is having an impact on the poorest entrepreneurs. This research, commissioned by Traidcraft Exchange, examines UK and EU spending on “aid for trade” . The study was supported by CAFOD as part of their Thinking Small work, which promotes support for poor producers and small businesses as a sustainable route out of poverty.

  • Green Economy (May 2012) Green Economy (May 2012) (218kb, pdf)

    A brief which unpicks different approaches to the green economy, to identify what changes would really work for poor men and women.

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