Inclusive and integrated energy planning

Renewable energy helping farmers affected by climate change in Kenya to make a sustainable living.

Solar panels helping farmers affected by climate change in Kenya to make a sustainable living. The Sustainable Development Goals support action on climate change, renewable energy, hunger and other development issues

Access to, affordable, reliable, safe and sustainable energy is increasingly recognised as crucial for many development areas, including food and water security, health, and education, and for addressing gender inequality and supporting climate change action. Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 aims to deliver universal access to energy by 2030

To deliver the full development benefits of energy access as an enabler of household and community health, education, livelihoods, and gender equality, more inclusive and integrated approaches are needed so that energy services are designed to meet the development needs of poor and vulnerable groups and are better targeted and integrated with wider development planning.

CAFOD and IIED have developed such an inclusive planning approach - the Energy Delivery Models (EDM) approach. EDM is a problem-solving, participatory approach that identifies the priority needs of different target groups, builds understanding of their local socio-cultural context, and the barriers and enabling factors for energy service delivery. EDM identifies the ‘gaps’ preventing the development needs being met (related to energy but also other, non-energy factors), and develops solutions that are financially, environmentally, and socially sustainable. Its participatory approach builds wider stakeholder understanding, and creates buy-in among stakeholders and partners and strengthens participants’ own planning skills.

Piloting and experience in several countries working with communities, social enterprises and NGOs resulted in the EDM Toolkit (2017), which consolidates the approach into a six-step planning process which uses existing and innovative tools (the Delivery Model Map and the Delivery Model Canvas). From 2018 onwards, in working with local partners, the EDM has been used in Kenya to develop a County Energy Plan (CEP) for Kitui County. The approach is being used at greater scale – Kitui County has over one million inhabitants - while retaining its essential features: inclusive engagement with local stakeholders, building contextual understanding and working across sectors

Resources on designing energy delivery models

Found 3 results

  • Planning pro-poor energy services for maximum impact: The Energy Delivery Model Toolkit Planning pro-poor energy services for maximum impact: The Energy Delivery Model Toolkit (2mb, pdf)
    Ben Gardside (IIED) and Sarah Wykes (CAFOD)

    This report introduces the EDM toolkit, a six-step process with two innovative tools for inclusive planning of energy services. The toolkit aims to ensure services are appropriate to the local context, meet end users’ development needs and are financially, socially and environmentally sustainable, maximising their impact. The report summarises the process of testing the EDM approach with partners in Indonesia. It outlines the learning from this experience, including wider insights into improving the sustainability and scalability of last-mile energy services and the costs of sub-optimal service design and delivery that merit further research and analysis. 

  • Using the Energy Delivery Models toolkit to analyse impact: a small-scale horticulture project in Kenya Using the Energy Delivery Models toolkit to analyse impact: a small-scale horticulture project in Kenya (5mb, pdf)

    From 2011 to 2014, CAFOD and local partners in Kenya implemented a Community Based Green Energy Project aimed at addressing some of the challenges in the agricultural sector by providing energy services for rural and peri-urban communities. This study reviews the project’s impact on a sample of farmers groups in Kitui county.

  • An approach to designing energy delivery models that work for people living in poverty, 2013 An approach to designing energy delivery models that work for people living in poverty, 2013 (2mb, pdf)

    This CAFOD and IIED report outlines guidelines for participatory analysis to understand the needs and wants of the potential end users and identify potential actors in the energy supply chain. The approach also uses innovative visualisation tools to build a ‘delivery model’ that has a greater chance of being socially, financially and environmentally sustainable.

    >> Download the report in Spanish: Diseño de modelos de suministro de energía: un enfoque orientado a las personas que viven en la pobreza

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