Climate change and integral ecology

Policy and research

Bolivia farmer in Andes

Farmers near the Andean village of Chilavi, Bolivia. A changing climate has contributed to increasing water scarcity in the region.

Evidence from CAFOD partners shows how the impacts of a changing climate – ranging from more extreme weather events to seasonal changes such as more persistent droughts - are making it more difficult for poor communities to lift themselves out of poverty.

Our analysis also highlights that 26 out of the 30 countries most vulnerable to natural disasters and a changing climate are least developed countries (LDCs). 44% of those people at highest risk are already living in extreme poverty.

Governments have agreed under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) a threshold of 2°C for global warming. However, CAFOD supports a lower defence line of 1.5°C, given that for many Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island States (SIS) this is a matter of survival.

Poorer countries - who are not responsible for causing the pollution driving climate change – must receive adequate and timely support (financing, technical assistance, technology transfer and capacity building) to build resilience to current and future impacts, as well as development paths that are greener and socially inclusive.

CAFOD works on the following policy areas: climate finance, the Green Climate Fund, ensuring social justice in greening economies.

Resources on climate change and integral ecology

Found 16 results

  • UK climate finance actions Assessing UK International Climate Finance Actions

    This report focuses on the UK’s International Climate Finance (ICF) and examines whether ICF actions are supporting the Global Goal on Adaptation (GGA) of the Paris Agreement.

  • Executive Summary: Climate Action for the Common Good Executive Summary: Climate Action for the Common Good (145kb, pdf)

    This is the Executive Summary of Climate Action for the Common Good: Reflecting the principles of Laudato Si’ in our transformative response to the climate crisis

  • Full report: Climate Action for the Common Good Full report: Climate Action for the Common Good (624kb, pdf)

    Almost two years on from the UN climate talks that delivered the ground-breaking Paris Agreement, CAFOD, in collaboration with our sister organisations in CIDSE, has produced a short guide to help governments and others reflect on how they are responding to the challenge of climate change in light of Laudato Si’. It offers a set of principles to support dialogue on how we are currently doing against the ambitions we set, and how well our current plans address the linked challenges of environmental degradation, poverty and inequality. It aims to support us all in increasing the ambition of our actions on climate change.

  • CAFOD’s submission to the Green Climate Fund in relation to the Strategic Plan, December 2015 CAFOD’s submission to the Green Climate Fund in relation to the Strategic Plan, December 2015 (530kb, pdf)

    The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was set up under the UNFCCC to be the main channel for international climate finance and is intended to have a transformational approach to supporting climate action in developing countries. The GCF Board is currently deciding a strategic plan for the Fund. This paper sets out CAFOD’s recommendations for how the strategic plan can ensure that GCF investments result in truly transformational impacts, in terms of delivering climate compatible, socially inclusive development

  • Starting Off On the Right Foot: Principles for evaluating the first projects supported by the Green Climate Fund, 2015 Starting Off On the Right Foot: Principles for evaluating the first projects supported by the Green Climate Fund, 2015 (657kb, pdf)

    The 11th Board Meeting of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) will take place 2 – 5 November 2015 in Livingstone, Zambia. The first tranche of projects is expected to be approved. This paper sets out the key principles by which projects should be evaluated to ensure they are truly transformative and meet the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable.

  • Getting Climate Finance Right: Successful Examples for the Green Climate Fund from around the World, 2015 Getting Climate Finance Right: Successful Examples for the Green Climate Fund from around the World, 2015 (2mb, pdf)

    With the establishment of the Green Climate Fund (GCF), the international community has an opportunity to design a fund that delivers climate finance to those who need it most and build truly transformative, climate resilient development. In this report, the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) showcases 22 concrete examples of projects, programmes and policies that could deliver this vision, including CAFOD’s Community-Based Green Energy (CBGE) project in Kenya. This aim is to inform the Board and Secretariat of the GCF as it begins selecting its first projects to fund ahead of the UNFCCC talks in Paris in December 2015.

  • The Green Climate Fund: supporting clean energy investment The Green Climate Fund: supporting clean energy investment (885kb, pdf)

    The Green Climate Fund (GCF) has been set up to be the main channel for future climate finance and has an innovative mandate to promote a “transformational” paradigm shift towards low-emission and climate-resilient development pathways in developing countries. This briefing argues that the GCF must have an energy policy that is truly transformational by prioritizing low carbon energy and decentralized energy solutions to lift the billions of people without access to modern electricity and clean cooking facilities out of poverty.

  • Catholic international organisations facing up to climate change Catholic international organisations facing up to climate change (831kb, pdf)

    Ahead of the UN Climate talks, COP20, from the 1-12 December 2014 in Lima, Peru, CAFOD joined our sister organisations in CIDSE and Caritas Internationalis, in jointly producing a position paper to call for a firm commitment from governments to put the poor at the centre of climate change policy. Together we represent 180 Catholic relief and development organisations and this document represents the shared priorities in addressing climate change and its impact on development.

  • Securing social justice in green economies, 2014 Securing social justice in green economies, 2014 (3mb, pdf)

    This paper expands on the analysis in our previous short briefing. Green and just development requires two key ingredients: integrated policymaking and a holistic outcome framework combining environmental, social and economic objectives. Focusing on developing countries, this paper draws on learning from national case studies and international analyses. It concludes with ten critical considerations for shaping green and just national strategies and policies.

  • The right climate for development: why the SDGs must act on climate now, 2014 The right climate for development: why the SDGs must act on climate now, 2014 (2mb, pdf)

    This briefing outlines the latest findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that climate change is already affecting poverty reduction and sustainable development. If action is not taken to cut emissions and to support communities to adapt, its impacts will only increase. The new UN Post-2015 development Framework, to be agreed in September 2015, will include a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These offer a crucial opportunity to ensure the threat to poverty reduction from climate change is adequately addressed. Robust action on climate change must be integrated throughout the SDGs and reinforced in a strong standalone goal on climate.

  • Doubling climate ambition: How the Post-2015 processes and UNFCCC processes complement each other - Discussion paper, April 2014 Doubling climate ambition: How the Post-2015 processes and UNFCCC processes complement each other - Discussion paper, April 2014 (1,009kb, pdf)

    A paper by international environment and development organisations including CAFOD, WWF, ODI, Oxfam, Christian Aid and CAN International arguing that only by treating the Post-2015 and UNFCCC processes as complementary can they raise the necessary ambition for climate action. The two processes will be agreed within weeks of each other (end of September and beginning of December 2015); have significant overlap in the issues covered; will both need to be implemented through national development plans and will be seeking finance from similar sources.

  • Green economy briefing, 2014 Green economy briefing, 2014 (134kb, pdf)

    Green economy and green growth policymaking are moving to the centre of many national development strategies. But policymakers often fail to take sufficient account of the social implications and costs of such policies — and miss valuable opportunities for social synergies, to the detriment of people living in poverty. Diverse country experiences of green policymaking demonstrate a spectrum of approaches, ranging from no social analysis or action, to pursuing transformational social change. This briefing draws on learning from a wide range of national case studies to propose ten guidelines for promoting national strategies and policies that are both green and just.

  • What have we done? How the changing climate is hitting the poorest hardest What have we done? How the changing climate is hitting the poorest hardest (3mb, pdf)

    This CAFOD report explores the effects of climate change on some of the world’s poorest communities. It highlights that climate change is real, that it is happening now and that the burden for resolving the problem lies heavily on the shoulders of rich countries - whose unsustainable economic paths are the root cause of it.

  • Quick off the Blocks, 2012 Quick off the Blocks, 2012 (1mb, pdf)

    CAFOD report looking at UK adaptation finance and integrated planning.

  • Fair Finance, 2011 Fair Finance, 2011 (7mb, pdf)

    Briefing on ensuring developing countries benefit from carbon pricing of international transport.

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