Emergencies and conflict

Emergency aid supplied by CAFOD's partner Caritas

Emergency aid supplied by CAFOD's partner Caritas

Our Humanitarian Policy work focuses on specific countries and emergencies, advocating to governments and other international bodies to ensure that humanitarian assistance reaches those in need. Our work also aims to achieve change within the Humanitarian System to enable more effective, efficient and locally-led humanitarian response.

Key areas of our Humanitarian Policy work cover:

Featured CAFOD Humanitarian Policy reports

Found 17 results

  • The importance of ensuring local and community level peace in South Sudan: Joint letter from British NGOs on International Day of Peace The importance of ensuring local and community level peace in South Sudan: Joint letter from British NGOs on International Day of Peace. (345kb, pdf)
    CAFOD, Tearfund et al.

    To mark the International Day of Peace, 21 September, and reflecting upon the signing of a recent peace agreement in South Sudan, British aid agencies release a joint-statement highlighting the importance of community-level peacebuilding to ensure lasting peace and reconciliation to end the country’s civil war.

  • Lake Chad Basin Humanitarian Crisis-Caritas Position Paper Lake Chad Basin Humanitarian Crisis-Caritas Position Paper (659kb, pdf)
    CAFOD, Caritas Maroua-Mokolo et al.

    Members of the Caritas family are present in all countries affected by the Lake Chad Basin crisis. They offer insights and recommendations to national governments gathered at the High Level Conference on the Lake Chad Region, as well as to the international community, donors, UN agencies and NGOs.

  • Highlights and Ways Forward: A Synopsis of Grand Bargain Signatories’ Achievements and Challenges Implementing their Grand Bargain Workstream 2 Com... Highlights and Ways Forward: A Synopsis of Grand Bargain Signatories’ Achievements and Challenges Implementing their Grand Bargain Workstream 2 Commitments on Localisation (169kb, pdf)
    CAFOD and other humanitarian organisations

    To mark the second anniversary of the signing of the Grand Bargain, and launch of the Charter4Change, signatories to both initiatives highlight the achievements and challenges they have contributed towards, and recommendations for the future. This paper specifically measures progress in relation to workstream 2 of the Grand Bargain.; more support and funding tools to local and national responders. The report will be launched at the annual Grand Bargain meeting, ahead of the Humanitarian Affairs Segment (ECOSOC) taking place at the United Nations in New York, the week beginning 18 June.

  • From Commitments to Action From Commitments to Action (6mb, pdf)
    The Charter4Change reporting subgroup

    The second Charter4Change annual report, FromCommitments to Action, presents the highlights and challenges encountered by the Charter’s INGO signatories, and provides examples of good practice that have empowered and strengthened the abilities of local organisations and civil society to respond to disasters.

  • Promise to Practice-Following through on commitments to support the future of Syria and the region Promise to Practice-Following through on commitments to support the future of Syria and the region (3mb, pdf)
    Various humanitarian forums and organisations

    The conflict in Syria has created the largest displacement crisis in well over a generation, possibly since the second world war. Six million people remain displaced internally, more than five million are registered as refugees in neighbouring countries and over a million more have fled to Europe or elsewhere. Despite a moderate increase in return of mostly internally displaced people in 2017, the last year saw three newly displaced Syrians for every person who returned home. The recent escalations of violence in Idlib and Eastern Ghouta dramatically underline the point that Syria’s conflict, and the ordeal for its civilians, is far from over.

  • Brussels Syria Conference April 2018-Briefing Paper Brussels Syria Conference April 2018-Briefing Paper (412kb, pdf)
    Various Caritas member organisations

    Caritas member organisations are present in every country affected by the Syrian crisis, working to support internally displaced people within Syria, refugees in the neighbouring countries, and the communities who are so generously hosting them. Caritas welcomes the joint NGO paper, From Promise to Practice, which has been signed by 39 organisations. The most urgent need of the Syria crisis is for all parties to the conflict, supported by the international community, to find ways to bring about a peaceful negotiated end to the armed conflict, and Caritas welcomes the Brussels Conference’s emphasis on the need for political solutions to the crisis. We believe Syrian people, with a special emphasis on children and women, must be at the forefront of efforts to find a peaceful solution to the conflict and to start the process of reconciliation and peace building.

  • Charter for Change: From commitments to action Charter for Change: From commitments to action (2mb, pdf)
    Report written on behalf of Charter4Change

    The Charter4Change 1 year progress report highlights success and challenges reported from C4C signatories implementing the Charter’s commitments.  

  • Time for HR to Step Up Time for HR to Step Up (2mb, pdf)
    Ben Emmens

    This policy-to-practice paper builds on the ‘Time to move on: National perspectives on transforming surge capacity’ report commissioned by four Charter4Change signatories CAFOD, Christian Aid, Islamic Relief and Tearfund as part of their work with the Start DEPP Transforming Surge Capacity Project, and written by Andy Featherstone. It is intended to provide the humanitarian HR community with practical guidance relating to the implementation of the report’s main recommendations.

  • Time to Move On Time to Move On (8mb, pdf)
    Andy Featherstone

    This study aims to research national NGO experiences of recruitment for surge by international NGOs and attempt to identify good practices as well as document impact, and develop recommendations and an action plan for taking the findings forward within the Transforming Surge Capacity Project (TSCP)1 and more widely in the humanitarian sector

  • Livelihoods and social cohesion must be priority sectors in the Syria crisis response Livelihoods and social cohesion must be priority sectors in the Syria crisis response (305kb, pdf)
    Anne Street, Head of Humanitarian Policy at CAFOD

    This paper calls on donors and the international community to increase the focus of attention on livelihoods and social cohesion, which remain amongst the most underfunded sectors of the Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan (for the Syria crisis response)

  • Seven Steps to Saving Lives and Assisting People in Nigeria and Lake Chad Basin - Statement by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) Seven Steps to Saving Lives and Assisting People in Nigeria and Lake Chad Basin - Statement by Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) (300kb, pdf)
    CAFOD and others

    On 23 and 24 February 2017 the international community convened in Oslo, Norway to discuss how to address the humanitarian crisis in North East Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin. This statement from CAFOD and other concerned non-governmental organisations welcomes this initiative and suggests seven steps needed to save more lives and assist people in Nigeria and Lake Chad Basin.

  • Strengthening capacities: CAFOD’s vision to promote locally-led humanitarian response Strengthening capacities: CAFOD’s vision to promote locally-led humanitarian response (343kb, pdf)
    Rhea Bhardwaj and Timothy Cohen (CAFOD)

    CAFOD’s Humanitarian Capacity Development (HCD) programme exists to reinforce the ability of local actors to respond to crises. These objectives are achieved through accompanying partners on a journey; identifying strengths and weaknesses, providing support to strengthen their response capabilities and ultimately letting go and allowing these actors to deliver programmes in a manner which is sustainable and grounded in the affected community.

    Upon completion of the HCD programme’s first stage, a review and documentation of the programme’s progress was undertaken, which in turn will help to inform how CAFOD approaches humanitarian capacity development in the future. This paper provides an overview of these findings and highlights the successes and challenges encountered during the accompaniment  journey, to date.

  • A safe haven? A safe haven? (2mb, pdf)

    CAFOD has contributed to this report on Britain’s role in protecting refugees.

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