Sustainable Development Goals

CAFOD researchers work on many of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals agreed at the UN in 2015

CAFOD researchers work on many of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals agreed at the UN in 2015

What are the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?

In 2015 global leaders agreed a new set of Sustainable Development Goals to eradicate extreme poverty, tackle inequality and put us all on a more sustainable pathway by 2030. The SDGs replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). CAFOD has been advocating for new global development goals since 2011 when 104 of our partners told us that the goals are important to the work they do with communities around the world.

What does CAFOD think about the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals? 

The SDGs are a step forwards as they better reflect national contexts, include issues like energy and climate change which were previously excluded, and were created through a more open and inclusive process that responded to the priorities of people with direct experience of poverty.

CAFOD was one of the founding organisations of the global civil society campaign, Beyond 2015. We have contributed to many of their policy positions. CAFOD is also member of Together 2030, the new global coalition following Beyond 2030. 

Our research papers and reports cover issues such as poverty, sustainable environment, sustainable development and Laudato Si and SDGs.

Sustainable Development Goals policy and research papers

Found 9 results

  • Engaging in the 2030 Agenda through the lens of Laudato Si’ Engaging in the 2030 Agenda through the lens of Laudato Si’ (3mb, pdf)
    Graham Gordon and Diego Martinez-Schutt, CAFOD

    Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development officially was agreed by the UN in 2015 and came into force on 1 January 2016. In many ways, this Agenda represents the global consensus for development and includes some transformational shifts in thinking, including to leave no-one behind, integrate environment and development and tackle inequality. In the same year, Pope Francis published his encyclical, Laudato Si’ – On care for our common home. Laudato Si’ affirms much of the transformational approach of the 2030 Agenda. It also questions the current model of development, and invites everyone to engage in a dialogue to re-define progress and to promote an integral human development that can benefit all – particularly the poorest and most vulnerable people – while respecting the natural environment. Governments are expected to develop plans to implement the SDGs and to do so with the active participation of civil society groups. These plans are likely to have significant influence on government policies and budgets for social, environmental and economic issues, as well as donor priorities and funding. The challenge is to engage constructively based on our Catholic identity, Catholic Social Teaching and the reality of the populations that we are working with. This document aims to help people and organisations to do just that. Currently available in English and Spanish, translation is planned into Italian and French.

    Download the report in Spanish: Participación en la Agenda 2030 desde el prisma de la Laudato Si’

  • Post-2015: Which targets build climate-compatible development? Post-2015: Which targets build climate-compatible development? (524kb, pdf)

    This briefing provides a checklist of all relevant targets in the Open Working Group (OWG) proposal for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) against the question “Will this target support development that is climate compatible?”

  • COMPASS 2015: ‘Artisans of our own Destiny’, A theological reflection from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, prepared by Tina Beattie, 2014 COMPASS 2015: ‘Artisans of our own Destiny’, A theological reflection from the perspective of Catholic Social Teaching, prepared by Tina Beattie, 2014 (771kb, pdf)

    Professor Tina Beattie is a British theologian, writer and broadcaster. Inspired by the participatory research CAFOD commissioned with four partners in Bolivia, Uganda, Zimbabwe and the Philippines, Professor Beattie looks at COMPASS 2015 through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching.

  • Building from the ground up, 2013 Building from the ground up, 2013 (632kb, pdf)

    This CAFOD policy briefing builds on the work done in "100 Voices", our work on what happens post-2015, and the importance of involving actors from the developing world in all decisions.

  • 1000 days, 2012 1000 days, 2012 (2mb, pdf)

    We hail the progress made in many areas since the agreement of the Millennium Development Goals, but state that work must begin urgently on designing a replacement framework.

  • 100 Voices 100 Voices

    This research from 2011 with 104 of our partners in developing countries shows global development goals are important for the work that they do with poor and marginalized communities around the world, but there need to be some important changes in what the goals cover and how they are created. 

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